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Leviticus 8

Started by Kephapaulos, February 15, 2017, 10:31:05 PM

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Kephapaulos

I was just reading it the other day, and I could see very much the symbolism and prefigurement of the Catholic priesthood and how Our Lord would institute it on Holy Thursday. I say this at least to start this new thread. We need to get this forum more active.

Geremia

Hebrews 5, 6, and 7 discusses how the Catholic priesthood is "according to the order of Melchisedech" (Ps. 109:4), too.

Kephapaulos

Where can one find out about how the Apostles were ordained priests and consecrated bishops?

I think of someday looking in The Primitive Church by Rev D.I. Lanslots, O.S.B. and How Christ Said the First Mass by Fr. James L. Meagher, D.D.

Geremia

Quote from: Kephapaulos on July 23, 2017, 01:52:38 AMHow Christ Said the First Mass by Fr. James L. Meagher, D.D.
That book seems excellent. I've added it to the e-book library. An excerpt:
QuoteWorldly people look with wonder at the Mass, and Often say: What is the meaning of this form of divine worship? Where did these ceremonies come from? Why are candles lighted during daytime?Why do the priests wear such peculiar robes? Why don't they say the service in a language the people can understand?

The Catholic sometimes says to himself: The Mass came from the Last Supper. But did Christ or the apostles say Mass as priest or bishop of our time? Did Christ that night follow any form of worship? If he did, where is it found? From ancient days the Church used the Ordinary of the Mass, but we do not know its origin.

Many questions rise in people's minds to which they find no answer. A common opinion holds that Christ said the First Mass at the Last Supper according to a short form of blessing and prayer, then consecrated the bread and wine, gave the apostles Communion, and preached the sermon John's Gospel gives. When the apostles said Mass, they recited some Psalms, read the Scriptures, preached a sermon, consecrated the bread and wine, recited the Lord's Prayer and then gave Communion. In the apostolic age the saints added other prayers and ceremonies. Afterwards Popes and councils still more developed the rites, composed new prayers, and that during the Middle Ages the Mass grew and expanded into the elaborate Liturgy and Ceremonial of our day.

But these opinions are wrong. From the beginning the Mass was said according to a long Liturgy and with ceremonies differing little from those of our time. No substantial addition was made after the apostolic age what the early Popes did was of minor importance—revisions and corrections. Little addition was made to the Ordinary of the Mass handed down from the days of Peter, founder of our Latin Liturgy.

Geremia

#4
Quote from: Kephapaulos on July 23, 2017, 01:52:38 AMWhere can one find out about how the Apostles were ordained priests and consecrated bishops?
Fr. Hardon, S.J., says this in his definition of "apostle":
QuoteThey were ordained priests by Christ at the Last Supper and were commissioned by him to preach the Gospel to all mankind (Matthew 28:19-20).
There is a difference between the Apostles and bishops (from the "Apostolic College" OCE entry):
QuoteAlthough both, bishops and Apostles, are appointed by Divine authority, yet the Apostles received their commission immediately from Christ, whereas the bishops receive theirs but mediately, i.e. through the medium of human authority. The power of order and jurisdiction is the same in the Apostles and in their successors, but, whereas the Apostles receive it from the Divine Founder Himself, the bishops receive it through the channel of other bishops. Immediate commission implies, in the missionary, the power to produce, at first hand, credentials to prove that he is the envoy of God by doing works which God alone can work. Hence the charisma, or gift, of miracles granted to the Apostles, but withheld from the generality of their successors whose mission is sufficiently accredited through their connection with the original Apostolate.

Geremia

Quote from: Kephapaulos on July 23, 2017, 01:52:38 AMI think of someday looking in The Primitive Church by Rev D.I. Lanslots, O.S.B.
Look into it here.