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John Paul II's 1995 Baltimore address

Started by Geremia, May 15, 2020, 10:45:10 AM

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Geremia

May 15, 2020, 10:45:10 AM Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 10:50:49 AM by Geremia
John Paul II's 8 Oct. 1995 address in Baltimore is very ecumaniacal; he promoted the heresies of Americanism, religious indifference, and freedom of conscience:
Quote2. Maryland holds a special place in the history of American Catholicism, indeed in the religious history of the nation. It was here that religious freedom and civic tolerance were enshrined in the American experience, just as in recent times Maryland has been a pioneering area in ecumenical and interreligious dialogue.

Today, religious tolerance and cooperation among Americans cannot simply be a pragmatic or utilitarian undertaking, a mere accommodation to the fact of diversity. No, the source of your commitment to religious freedom is itself a deep religious conviction. Religious tolerance is based on the conviction that God wishes to be adored by people who are free: a conviction which requires us to respect and honor the inner sanctuary of conscience in which each person meets God. The Catholic Church wholly supports this conviction, as the Fathers of the Second Vatican Council proclaimed in the historic Declaration on Religious Freedom.
 
The challenge facing you, dear friends, is to increase people's awareness of the importance for society of religious freedom; to defend that freedom against those who would take religion out of the public domain and establish secularism as America's official faith. And it is vitally necessary, for the very survival of the American experience, to transmit to the next generation the precious legacy of religious freedom and the convictions which sustain it.
cf. Mirari Vos §§13-14

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